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April 26th, 2012
01:42 PM ET

Dad explains why he wired his son, says he was heartbroken when listening to recordings of teachers talking about drinking, abusing kids

It's a story that's creating a national stir: A father in New Jersey planting a recording device on his 10-year-old son to spy on his teachers in the classroom.

Stuart Chaifetz became suspicious when administrators told him Akian, who has autism, had been acting out violently in school.
Chaifetz hooked up his son with a wiretap and that tape had stunning revelations.

With over six hours of recordings, Chaifetz says teachers and aides are heard apparently talking about alcohol and sex in front of the class, punctuated by yelling at his son to "shut your mouth."

The school fired an aide, but another teacher caught on tape was just transferred to another school.

Chaifetz explains why he was compelled to wire his son, and talks about the enormous public support he's received.

Dad explains wiring son to catch abuser

Dad: Blame tenure for teacher transfer

Public support for dad who wired son


Filed under: Education
soundoff (2 Responses)
  1. Paul

    Stuart Chaifetz has shown us why live audio and video feeds should be installed in every classroom where the most vulnerable students can be subjected to abuse. This is necessary because when the victimization occurs the student is unable to adequately verbalize what has occurred. The same logic applies to others who find themselves in similar situations where they are most vulnerable to abuse, i.e., critical care health settings, day care settings, etc.

    April 27, 2012 at 2:23 am | Report abuse | Reply

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