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June 22nd, 2012
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DNC chair Wasserman Schultz (D-FL): Republicans in Congress and Romney 'rooting for failure' of U.S. economy, says Romney has 'extreme' policy on immigration

The economy is the number one issue on the minds of voters gearing up for the Presidential elections in November. Will gloomy economic reports hurt President Obama's reelection chances?

Democratic National Committee Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) says President Obama is concentrating on turning the economy around, but Republican lawmakers have been standing in the way.

"We are focused, as President Obama has been since the start of his term, on making sure that we can continue to push forward on bringing the economy...moving forward, stronger, creating jobs and getting things turned around," Rep. Wasserman Schultz says. "It's all the more reason why the Republicans that I work with in the House of Representatives and in the Senate need to come to the table and work with President Obama to make job creation a priority."

"This has been, quite frankly, close to if not the most do-nothing of do-nothingest Congresses," Rep. Wasserman Schultz adds. "The time that we are spending out of session rather than in session focusing on job creation has just been appalling."

Rep. Wasserman Schultz says Congress needs to pass President Obama's "to-do list", which includes the Jobs Act. "Unfortunately, the Republicans in Congress and Mitt Romney continue to demonstrate that they are rooting for failure," the DNC chair says.

Rep. Wasserman Schultz also addresses Mitt Romney's speech before the NALEO convention, saying that it was vague and voters don't realize the GOP candidate is 'extreme' on immigration. See the clip below. Transcript available after the jump.

RUSH TRANSCRIPT

O'BRIEN: You've got a lot of bad news you have to deal with. How is this going to affect the election, do you think?

SCHULTZ: Well, we are focused as President Obama has been since the start of his term on making sure that we can continue to push forward on bringing the economy moving forward stronger, creating jobs, and getting things turned around. And it's all the more reason why the Republicans that I work with in the House of Representatives and in the Senate need to come to the table and work with President Obama to make job creation a priority.

I mean, this has been quite frankly close to if not the most do nothing of do nothingest congresses. The time that we are spending out of session rather than in session focusing on job creation has just been appalling. And what we need to do is focus on President Obama's to-do list for Congress, which includes passing legislation that would make the critical investments that we need to make to create jobs and get things moving forward even more strongly.

O'BRIEN: So, I'll give - let's do a big hypothetical. Let's say, OK, that is done. Let's say by some miracle, which is a big giant if, as you well know, everybody comes together, kumbaya, and they pass the Jobs Act.

You're talking about 1 million jobs in a sea of 26 million jobs that are - or people that are unemployed, right? Isn't that ultimately really a drop in the bucket? That can't be the only thing to look forward to.

SCHULTZ: Well, of course. No, no, of course not.

The president's to-do list includes the making those critical investments so we can create more jobs, making sure that we work together on a tax policy that strikes a balance on deficit reduction. And insures that when it comes to focusing on the middle class and working families that we insure that small businesses and the middle class get the tax breaks that they need, while not cutting our way to deficit reduction, and really draining the economy of the resources that it needs for progress, because we know that there's a fragile recovery underway.

And every major economic expert has said you can't cut your way to deficit reduction. If you pull out too much, too fast, then you'll really have a problem. So, we need to make sure that the people who are already doing fabulously well in this country pay a little bit more. That everybody has a fair shot. Everybody pays their fair share. And everybody plays by the same set of rules.

O'BRIEN: Let's -

SCHULTZ: Those are the goals that we need to work together on. And unfortunately, the Republicans in Congress and Mitt Romney continue to demonstrate that they are rooting for failure. As evidenced, Soledad, by the Romney campaign telling my state's governor that they should tone down the progress and the celebration about the progress that our state's made, because that's not in line with what the Romney campaign wants to telegraph about the president's record on job creation.

O'BRIEN: So, let me stop you there just to bring people up to speed. You're talking about the state of Florida. And as I know you know, the Romney campaign has denied they have done that, although it is a report in "Bloomberg".

SCHULTZ: Of course they have denied it.

O'BRIEN: So let's turn for a minute and talk a little bit about Mitt Romney and what he has done saying about immigration. He spoke in front of NALEO, the organization of Latino leaders. What did you make of his comments?

SCHULTZ: Well, not very much. It was - as you said earlier this morning, when you interviewed my colleague Randy Forbes, Mitt Romney was about as vague as he could be. There was no specific proposal. No clear path so that the 12 million undocumented immigrants in this country would know under a Romney presidency what their future would hold.

You know, the only thing that he has done is tell them that he keeps his promises. Well, if we look at Mitt Romney's promises, he just recently - I mean, he's hoping that the American people don't have a very long memory. But during the primary, he said during the debates and on the stump that he would have vetoed the DREAM Act.

This is a candidate that has the most extreme policy on immigration of any presidential candidate in recent memory. He has embraced the Arizona style immigration laws and has those leaders who wrote those laws as his campaign advisers on immigration. So we should believe him when he says that he would veto the DREAM Act, we should believe him. We should believe him on the specifics he has given us which are all extreme, and which would really mean a terrible future for those who are in this country through no fault of their own, like the young people that President Obama gave a path to remain in this country and either serve in our military or attend college or make sure that they can continue the only dream they've ever lived, which is the American dream.

O'BRIEN: Mitt Romney has said that he'll be fleshing out more of a response. I guess we'll be watching for that.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz -

SCHULTZ: Waiting with baited breath.

O'BRIEN: I certainly am, I know.

She is the chairman of the Democratic National Committee. Nice to talk to you as always, thank you. Appreciate your time.

SCHULTZ: Thanks, Soledad.

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