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June 28th, 2012
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Fact Check: Are common claims about the health care law true?

The health care law has been in effect for 828 days and it's been the subject of intense criticism since its inception.

Congressional Republicans have been among the law's harshest critics. This morning, they are promising a full repeal of the law if the Supreme Court lets the health care legislation stand.

Accordingly, the Starting Point team took some time to fact check a few claims about health care reform on today's show.

First, is the presiden'ts health care law driving up the cost of health care?

Health insurance premiums jumped nine percent from 2010 to 2011, an increase Republicans blame on the health care law. However, according to factcheck.org, the law only caused about a one to three percent increase in costs. The rest of the nine percent was due to rising health care costs.

Additionally, the increase caused by the law, was the result of increased benefits. For instance, allowing children to stay on their parent's policies until they are 26, or covering children with pre-existing conditions.

Another question, does the health care law make it harder for small businesses to hire new workers?

The fact is, businesses with fewer than 50 employees are exempt and according to factcheck.org, experts predict the law may cause a small loss of low wage jobs, but will also create an increase in better paying jobs in the health care and insurance industries.

Finally, is it fair to say that the health care law was passed by the strong majority of a Democratically elected Congress, as President Obama has claimed?

No, the legislation was passed along party lines with 60 votes.


Filed under: Fact check • Health care
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